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Where can registered sex offenders live in texas

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A broad legal challenge has led more than 20 towns in Texas to ease restrictions over the last few months on where sex offenders can live instead of fight a costly battle in court. While other states, including neighboring Oklahoma, continue to push offenders away from some neighborhoods, about 45 Texas towns received letters in November from the group Texas Voices for Reason and Justice demanding they repeal residency restrictions. The nonprofit, which is critical of sex offender laws it considers ineffective, also has sued 14 towns and has a powerful ally — the state attorney general’s office. We advocate an individual assessment on a case-by-where can registered sex offenders live in texas basis to determine if someone is a threat to the community,” said Richard Gladden, an attorney for the group.

The myth that people who commit sex offenses just generally are unable to control their sexual conduct is just that, a myth. At issue is how Texas’ small towns are differentiated from larger ones. Communities with fewer than 5,000 people are “general law” towns, which can’t adopt an ordinance that the Legislature hasn’t permitted. Dozens of these smaller communities have restricted where sex offenders can live — usually with the purpose of keeping them away from schools and other places children gather — but only later learned they’ve run afoul of state rules.

Unless the Legislature expressly authorizes it, a general-law municipality may not adopt an ordinance restricting where a registered sex offender may live,” according to a 2007 opinion signed by then-AG Greg Abbott, who’s now Texas governor. Larger cities fall under “home rule,” which means they have “a constitutional right of self-government,” Abbott wrote. But the Texas Municipal League, which provides support services and lobbies on behalf of cities, is pushing for legislative action that reverses Abbott’s decision. It’s new where a general-law city has had its authority taken away by an attorney general’s opinion,” executive director Bennett Sandlin said. The state allows leaders in general law towns to fashion municipal rules for “the good government, peace or order of the municipality,” Sandlin said, such as zoning and noise control laws. But state officials can step in when local laws overreach.